Nutritional Ketosis VS Ketoacidosis
Jan16

Nutritional Ketosis VS Ketoacidosis

  Nutritional ketosis is a normal, physiological response to carbohydrate and energy restriction. A ketogenic diet is an effective weight loss strategy for many. Ketoacidosis, on the other hand, is a pathological condition caused by insulin deficiency. The common theme is low insulin; however, in ketoacidosis, blood glucose levels are very high. Ketone levels are elevated in both states, although are 10-20x higher in ketoacidosis...

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The Modern American Diet Causes Cancer
Jan16

The Modern American Diet Causes Cancer

Recent biochemical research into the metabolism of the essential fatty acids seems to have uncovered a major underlying cause of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. This biochemistry tells us that this cause is the modern American diet and that simple dietary change is capable of preventing these cancers. Finding the cause of a disease and then removing that cause is called primary disease prevention; the disease never occurs...

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Physical Performance and Fat Adaptation
Jan16

Physical Performance and Fat Adaptation

  Does the athlete need to “carb-up” for the best physical performance? Listen to this podcast from Peter Attia, MD with Vinnie Tortorich and Anna Vocino to find out. Is the Obesity Crisis Hiding a Bigger Problem? Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to...

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How Sugar Affects the Brain
Jan16

How Sugar Affects the Brain

When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine — an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. Source   Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens...

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Lack of Sleep Does Kill Brain Cells
Jan16

Lack of Sleep Does Kill Brain Cells

A new study from Uppsala University, Sweden, shows that one night of sleep deprivation increases morning blood concentrations of NSE and S-100B in healthy young men. These molecules are typically found in the brain. Thus, their rise in blood after sleep loss may indicate that a lack of snoozing might be conducive to a loss of brain tissue. The findings are published in the journal SLEEP. Read about the study here Are You Deficient?...

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Alcohol Does Not Kill Brain Cells
Jan16

Alcohol Does Not Kill Brain Cells

…recent research has shown that the quantity of alcohol you could possibly take in, without killing yourself, does not introduce enough alcohol into your bloodstream to kill brain cells. This was proven by a study by Grethe Jensen and co. (1993), who meticulously counted neurons in matched samples of non-alcoholics and alcoholics. What they found was that there was no real difference in the density or overall number of neurons...

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